Barre High School Spring '87 from the Barre Class Photos Collection
Barre High School Spring ’87 from the Barre Class Photos Collection

June is a traditional month for saying good bye to school friends and beginning on new and unknown paths. We are pleased to highlight this month’s addition of Class Photos from Barre High School provided by the Barre Historical Society, including the 130-year-old photo to the right. The Boston Public Library continues to add to established collections, which may see more use during the school year when old school friends meet again.

June is also Pride Month and the Digital Transgender Archive has uploaded seventy-seven (yes, 77!) new collections.  I can’t list them all, so follow the link and explore the various paths to a history that may be new and unknown to you.

Whatever path you choose, wherever you wind up,  may your journey begin with a visit to the Digital Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Barre Historical Society

Barre Class Photos – 64 items

Boston Public Library

 Transgender symbol pin  from the Digital Transgender Archive
Transgender symbol pin from the Digital Transgender Archive

Anti-Slavery Collection -2,178 items added to existing collection

Norman B. Leventhal Map Center Collection – 10 items added to existing collection

Shakespeare Collection – 101 items added to existing collection

Digital Transgender Archive 

Seventy-seven collections – 1,587 items harvested

"The works of Geoffrey Chaucer," from Early, Rare, and Exceptional Items from Special Collection, Rare Books.
“The works of Geoffrey Chaucer,” from Early, Rare, and Exceptional Items from Special Collection, Rare Books.

This month focused mostly on getting Northeastern University Library’s collections harvested. There are now 17 new collections from them, including a really wide variety of content! Don’t miss that, or any of the beautiful new items from the BPL’s collections.

Boston Public Library

Early, Rare, and Exceptional Items from Special Collections, Rare Books – 6 items

Norman B. Leventhal Map  Center Collection – 879 items added to existing collection

Northeastern University

Carmen A. Pola Papers – 318 items

Center for Spirituality, Dialogue and Service Records – 62 items

Citywide Educational Coalition Records – 1582 items

Frank J. Miranda Papers – 58 items

Freedom House, Inc. Records – 83 items

Frieda Garcia Papers – 84 items

Holocaust Awareness Committee Records – 161 items

Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción Records –  5101 items

James W. Fraser (Collector) Photograph Collection – 5 items

La Alianza Hispana Records – 3332 items

Lower Roxbury Black History Project Records – 839 items

"School Committee Pickets," from James W. Frazer (Collector) Photograph Collection
“School Committee Pickets,” from James W. Frazer (Collector) Photograph Collection

Melnea A. Cass Papers – 1 item

Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunity, Inc. Records – 943 items

Northeastern University Faculty Publications – 1 item

Northeastern University Photograph Collection – 7 items

Office of Community Affairs Records – 1 item

Phyllis M. Ryan Papers – 309 items

"Allen C. Hinckley. Hagen in Gotterdammerung," 1903. From Philip Hale Photograph Collection
“Allen C. Hinckley. Hagen in Gotterdammerung,” 1903. From Philip Hale Photograph Collection

Even though February is the shortest month of the year, we still managed to get a lot of new items into the Digital Commonwealth! Don’t miss any of the amazing new collections, including Judge Garrity’s chamber papers on the Boston Desegregation Case and historic photos of  campus life at Mass Art in the 1800s.

Boston Public Library

Colonial and Revolutionary Boston – 2 items added to existing collection

Hugo Münsterberg Collection, 1890-1916 – 1772 items

Philip Hale Photograph Collection – 661 items

Duxbury Free Library

Letters and Miscellaneous Papers of the Winsor Family 1820-1915 – 226 items

Fitchburg Public Library

Books from Fitchburg Public Library - 1 item

Massachusetts College of Art and Design

"Doper than Dope". From Massachusetts Hip-Hop Archive.
“Doper than Dope”. From Massachusetts Hip-Hop Archive.

Campus Life – 286 items

The Trustees of the Reservation, Archives & Research Center

The Appleton Family Photo Album Collection – 184 items

University of Massachusetts Boston, Joseph P. Healey Library 

Massachusetts Hip-Hop Archive – 231 items

Mosaic records and publication, 1980-1990 – 11 items

W. Arthur Garrity, Jr. chambers papers on the Boston School Desegregation Case – 568 items

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institutions

"Barberry Kennedy, Appleton Farms," 1947. From Appleton Family  Photo Album Collection
“Barberry Kennedy, Appleton Farms,” 1947. From Appleton Family Photo Album Collection

Thomas N. Kelley Papers – 6 items

 

Letter to the United Mine Workers Convention, September 20, 1921
Letter to the United Mine Workers Convention, September 20, 1921

This post was written by Patricia Feeley, BPL Collaborative Services Librarian.

Kimberly Reynolds, Curator of Manuscripts at the Boston Public Library, wanted to recognize the 90th anniversary of the deaths of Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti. Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were Italian immigrants and anarchists who were arrested and convicted of murder during the Red Scare of the 1920’s. The two men were executed on 23 August 1927. The conduct of the trial has been criticized ever since on legal and political grounds. Opinion is still divided over the guilt of these men.

The Aldino Felicani Sacco-Vanzetti Defense Committee Collection is one of the Boston Public Library’s (BPL) Collections of Distinction. Collections of Distinction are among the most outstanding and renowned of the BPL’s collections. The collection contains correspondence, meeting minutes, trial notebooks, financial records, legal documents, photographs, and scrapbooks. Broadsides, the armbands mourners wore at the funeral, Sacco and Vanzetti’s commingled ashes and their death masks are also included.

It was the correspondence of the two men that Kim chose to commemorate this anniversary. Sacco and Vanzetti wrote more than 200 letters while imprisoned. They wrote about their innocence, the effects of imprisonment, and their gratitude for the work of their defenders. They also wrote to each other about their friends and family. The correspondence, she points out, has significant research value.

<a href="https://www.digitalcommonwealth.org/search/commonwealth:tm70rj393">Letter from Sacco to Vanzetti, 18 June 1925</a>
Letter from Sacco to Vanzetti, 18 June 1925

The Sacco-Vanzetti Defense Committee Collection is one of the most used collections at the BPL. After the letters were digitized, Kim supplied links to researchers outside of the Boston area who were “thrilled” to have access to the men’s letters.

Kim had worked with the Digital Commonwealth (DC) team before when the BPL’s collection of Emily Dickinson letters to Thomas Wentworth Higginson, the Anti-Slavery Collection and the Margaret Fuller Papers, 1837-1884, among others, were digitized.  Kim always finds working with the team “excellent”.

It only took 5-6 months to get this latest collection fully digitized. Kim says the DC team taught her “how to look at collections digitally, so” she can now “prepare manuscripts both physically and virtually”. And she plans to keep working with the team. Sacco-Vanzetti collection memorabilia, photographs and – Kim’s personal favorite – posters are up next on the digitization agenda.

“My metadata might get changed to more appropriately describe an item the way it needs to virtually,” Kim says, but, “I trust them completely.”

Just months before his execution, Nicola Sacco instructed his attorney to cease trying to save his life. Regardless of guilt or innocence, it is a strong, poignant letter. You can read it here:

Letter to William G. Thompson, 6 April 1927
Letter to William G. Thompson, 6 April 1927
"Aerial View of Eastern States Exposition Grounds, Springfield, Mass." From Springfield College Archives and Special Collections
“Aerial View of Eastern States Exposition Grounds, Springfield, Mass.” From Springfield College Archives and Special Collections

As is appropriate for this autumn season, a lot of the collections added to Digital Commonwealth in the past month have been harvested (pun, obviously, very much intended). Don’t miss out on exploring all of the wonderful new items added to the site!

Boston Public Library

Anti-Slavery (Collection of Distinction) – 1819 items

Charlestown Lantern Slides – 616 items

Stereograph Collection – 6 items

 

NOBLE Digital Heritage

Collection reharvested – 6048 items

 

Phillips Academy Andover

"Arms and the Man overtunic, shirty, and pants." From Costume Archives of Williams College.
“Arms and the Man overtunic, shirty, and pants.” From Costume Archives of Williams College.

Abbot Academy Photographs – 689 items

 

Springfield College Archives and Special Collections

Cliff Smith YMCA Postcard Collection – 5212 items

 

Suffolk University, Moakley Archive & Institute

12 collections reharvested – 2800 items

 

Williams College

23 collections harvested – 1800 items

 

This post was written by Patricia Feeley, BPL Collaborative Services Librarian.

Catherine Louise Brown and Mildred Brown, Keitha's maternal aunts, and Henrietta "Yetta" Brown (later Burke), Keitha's mother
Catherine Louise Brown and Mildred Brown, Keitha’s maternal aunts, and Henrietta “Yetta” Brown (later Burke), Keitha’s mother” c. 1927-1929. From the Grove Hall Memory Project

 

When the Grove Hall Branch of the Boston Public Library began planning the Grove Hall Memory Project, it was their intention to make it available in a digital format.  Katrina Morse, now the Parker Hill Branch librarian and the driving force behind the Memory Project, wanted “anyone…anywhere in the world” to be able to access the materials.

The Memory Project’s goal was to provide audio/visual “snapshots” of the neighborhood through the years as reported by the people who lived there.  The collection includes letters, photographs, newspaper clippings and oral-history interviews with full transcriptions.   For Katrina, the interviews are the most interesting and valuable part of the collection.  You can listen to and/or read the transcripts of these interviews on Digital Commonwealth.

After the Memory Project collection was added to the Digital Commonwealth, Katrina reports that another branch librarian approached her about doing a similar project for her branch.  While Katrina says the project was incredibly time-consuming, she thinks it was worthwhile and is very pleased that Digital Commonwealth offers the collection a platform making it accessible to Grove Hall residents, former residents, and anyone interested in the history of a vital, ever-changing Boston  neighborhood “anywhere in the world.”

Recently, Digital Repository Developer Steven Anderson and Web Services Developer Eben English presented at the Open Repositories 2014 conference in Helsinki and at the Northeast Fedora Users Group (NEFUG) meeting in Boston.

Open Repositories is an annual international conference that brings together people and institutions responsible for the development, implementation, and management of digital repositories to share information and strategies for long-term preservation and access. Steven’s presentation was entitled “When Metadata Collides: Lessons on Combining Records from Multiple Repository Systems.” It summarizes the practical challenges involved in combining diverse descriptions, authorities, and technologies into the shared Digital Commonwealth repository and highlights the imaginative ways Steven and Eben have addressed them with the help of the Digital Projects department. Watch the seven-minute presentation online. Move the slider to the 52 minute mark to start with Steven’s talk. (Editor’s note: the previous link has had intermittent connection issues. Please continue to try the link until it resolves correctly.)

During the NEFUG meeting, Eben and Steven gave a presentation titled “digital_commonwealth_presentation” during the Hydra session. Steven presented on slides, that can be viewed here, and Eben gave a 10 minute demonstrations of teh actual portal. Steven also gave a lightening talk (aka “Dork Short”) about metadata combination challenges.

Over the past few months, the development work on the new Digital Commonwealth repository at the Boston Public Library has focused on functionality for ingesting metadata records via the Open Access Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH). This functionality enables Digital Commonwealth to include metadata created by institutions around the state in the central search interface, with links that point back to the original item hosted by the provider. (Digital Commonwealth currently harvests records from ten institutions and consortia, including the State Library of Massachusetts, NOBLE, SAILS, and C/W MARS to name a few.)

BPL development staff have been working closely with each OAI provider to tailor the ingest process to their preferred metadata format (Dublin Core, PBcore, MODS, etc.) as well as the system used by each institution to provide the records (CONTENTdm, Omeka, etc.) The crosswalking process, which converts the incoming metadata records into MODS, also involves a number of data standardization routines, including the transformation of date data into a facet-able and sortable date format based on W3C Date-Time Format, and the conversion of geographic subject/coverage data into hierarchical geographic subjects (state, county, city, etc.) and numeric latitude/longitude coordinates using data from the Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names. Whenever possible, the ingest process also generates thumbnail images for each object which are then stored in the Digital Commonwealth repository, along with an archival copy of the original metadata record prior to crosswalking.

While all of this involves significant time and effort, the result will be more accurate and more complete metadata records from these providers, and a better search and discovery experience for users as well as better representation of the data within larger shared contexts such as DPLA.

So far the OAI harvesting has been restricted to a test platform. By late February the BPL expects to finish the work on the OAI feeds at which point the feeds will be added to the public repository site (https://search.digitalcommonwealth.org). The focus will then turn to migrating the last few remaining collections from the DSpace repository into the new repository, and integrating the informational content on the current Omeka site into the new design. While no official date has been set for when the new repository will replace the existing systems and be launched as the “official” Digital Commonwealth site, it is anticipated that this milestone will be completed sometime in March.

The Boston Public Library received an award for its digitization work for Digital Commonwealth members at last month’s Griffin Museum of Photography’s eighth annual Focus Awards ceremony. The Focus Awards recognize contributions to the promotion, curation, and presentation of photography. The BPL received the Commonwealth Award, which is given to an organization that brings prominence to the local photographic scene.

“We are honored to receive this award for our digitization work,” said Amy E. Ryan, President of the Boston Public Library. “It is our great pleasure to contribute to Digital Commonwealth and help increase access to photos archives, cultural treasures, and other historical materials for people across Massachusetts and around the world.”

The annual Focus Awards was created by the Griffin Museum in 2006 in order to recognize critical contributions to the promotion of photography made by institutions and individuals. Tom Blake, Digital Projects Manager for the BPL, accepted the Commonwealth Award on the library’s behalf.

The award was presented to Tom by Bob Cullum, the grandson of photographer Leslie Jones (1886-1967). The Leslie Jones collection of nearly 40,000 glass negatives was digitized by the BPL and is now available for viewing in the new Digital Commonwealth repository that the BPL designed and built and now hosts — https://search.digitalcommonwealth.org/collections/commonwealth:2j62s484w.

The award is certainly very well deserved, not just for the work the BPL has done for the membership and organization of Digital Commownwealth, but the enormouse value this work provides the reputation of the Commonwealth as a whole. Congratulations!!

Over the last month or so, the development of the new Digital Commonwealth repository currently ongoing at BPL has focused on refining the batch upload process. The repository developers have been working closely with the BPL Digital Services metadata team to create a standardized spreadsheet format for ingest that will offer institutions the ability to provide rich metadata about their digital objects, while also being flexible, intuitive, and simple to use. This work has brought the goal of allowing institutions to do self-mediated batch uploads much closer, though there are still several issues to tackle before this functionality is ready to roll out.

Meanwhile, the beta testing phase of both the “Search” and “Admin” applications is ongoing and has received quite a bit of helpful feedback from a number of institutions/individuals that have taken the system for a test-drive.

The URLs are:
Search (public discovery): http://search.digitalcommonwealth.org/
Admin (ingest & management): http://admin.digitalcommonwealth.org/

In late September, development of the workflow for ingesting material into the repository via OAI-PMH will begin in order to aggregate records from the numerous institutions around the state that provide access to digital objects through their own repository systems. The BPL will be reaching out to institutions that currently contribute material to Digital Commonwealth via OAI-PMH feed to learn a more about existing data structures, preferred metadata formats for harvesting, back-end systems being used, and other details that will help this phase of the project move forward more smoothly.

Lastly, the BPL has set up a public Google Group email list for institutions and users to provide feedback or report issues with the new repository system. Anyone may read content posted to the group; membership is required to send messages to the list. See https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/digitalcommonwealth for details.