House on Chester Hill
House on Chester Hill Granville Public Library

Too many people think history is as dry as dust.  All dates and wars and people in funny clothes with funnier hats.  Show them their street 100 years ago or a 50-year-old yearbook for their high school and you have their attention. Ask them if they can identify a house on their street or its former owner and you have a Watson and the game’s afoot.

With the Granville Public Library’s collection digitized, Dick Rowley took advantage of other services offered by Digital Commonwealth.  He took an Omeka workshop on creating online exhibits.   The Granville Historic Image Library is the result.  The images are the main attraction, but there’s also an ongoing project to upload the Catalog of Historic Document Collections and Books from the Granville Public Library’s Historical Room with links to already-digitized versions of the Historical Room collection on websites like Internet Archive.

Dick also started posting Mystery Monday and Flashback Friday photos to the Granville Forum on Facebook.  He encouraged Forum members to contribute information and photos.  He got both.  Posters identified one old house as the original Baptist church that was moved across the street, so the new church could be built.  Even better, this wonderful wedding photo shows multiple generations of Granville residents at the wedding of Helen Alvina Hansen and Charles Louis Drolett, Jr. Dick reports the photo owner had no idea who the people in the photo were.  By posting it, Granville’s “village elders” were consulted and able to identify everyone.  Amongst the “elders”?  One of the little girls in the photo.

Find A Grave is one of the most popular websites for genealogists and local history buffs.  Dick has used the website to spread the wealth of resources in the Granville collection.  A distant relation will be thrilled to find a photo of Nathan Fenn on his Find A Grave page.  Although, my favorite has to be the Weekly Report on the Conduct of… Melissa Phelps.  What a delight for any descendant of Melissa Phelps Gaines to discover this gem.

Some of the stories are more poignant.  In trying to locate the oldest house in Granville, Dick was sent a photo of a 1934 copy of the Granville Center News.  The News is a story in itself.  It was published by Newton kids who summered in Granville.  They report on a resident of the purported oldest building, Chapin Brown, who was “slightly crazy”.  A little research uncovered the man had served in the Civil War.  Post-traumatic stress disorder?  Perhaps.  We don’t always get the full story, but a lot more of Chapin Brown’s has been restored because someone asked about the oldest house in town.

Susan A. Phelon Barber, AEF, Army Nurse Corp
Susan A. Phelon Barber, AEF, Army Nurse Corp Granville Public Library

A more inspirational story comes as a result of Dick’s collaboration with the Woodlands Cemetery Association (WCA).  This is my favorite.  The Granville Historic Image Library, Historical Room, Granville Public Library provides the images and the WCA provides the profiles of the interred in their newsletter.  Susan A. Phelon Barber was born and raised in Granville.  She was educated in Westfield and became a teacher.  She moved to Maine to study nursing and joined the U.S. Army nursing corps during World War I.  She served in Europe until 1919.  She then moved to Los Angeles to serve as a private nurse. Eventually, she returned to live in Granville and work as a nurse in Westfield.  She married a high school classmate in 1930 at the age of 45.

These remarkable people lived in a small town, but hardly had small lives.  If they were lost for a while, they have now been restored.  You can do the same for your small Massachusetts town and Digital Commonwealth can help.  Give us a call.  Let’s restore some more stories.

Noble and Cooley Drum Makers Band
Noble & Cooley Drum Makers Band Granville Public Library

A year ago, I got the listing of new collections added to the Digital Commonwealth.  I expect the Boston Public Library and UMass/Amherst to have extraordinary collections on Digital Commonwealth.  I am much more impressed when a small institution, like the Granville Public Library (GPL), uploads a collection that is impressive in its depth and breadth.  So naturally, I asked how this happened.

Mary Short, director of GPL, directed me to Dick Rowley, dedicated volunteer and raconteur.  It has been a fun and educational year of discovering where Granville started and where they’ve gone.  Dick   has done all he could on his own, through crowd sourcing and with partners to restore the story of Granville’s history.  My apologies to all concerned for my tardiness in posting this report.

1890 and 1891 Noble and Cooley payroll book
1890 and 1891 Noble & Cooley payroll book Noble & Cooley Center for Historic Preservation

Dick and his cousin, Thom Gilbert, were researching family history independently.  They decided to meet up halfway between Dick in Connecticut and Tom in eastern Massachusetts in Granville, the family’s old hometown.  They had discovered that the family had a connection to the Noble and Cooley Drum Company in Granville.  (See payroll book, right.)  This led them to the Noble and Cooley archives.  That is, if you define archives as boxes and boxes of materials in no particular order.

Luckily, Dick and Thom “stumbled” onto the Massachusetts State Historic Records Advisory Board Roving Archivist program.  If you are starting from scratch in organizing your historic collections, Dick says this is the program for you.  Rachel Onuf was extremely helpful in getting the Noble and Cooley Center for Historic Preservation (NCCHP) on the right track.  (Rachel has moved on and Sara Jane Poindexter is the current roving archivist.) Dick’s first experience with Digital Commonwealth (DC) was with the digitization of the NCCHP collection.  They started with the company’s catalogs, which were a big hit with collectors, including Jay Leno.  They went on to add correspondence, employee records, etc. And were they able to confirm the family connection with Noble and Cooley? Long lost payroll records dating back to 1890 were discovered showing that many ancestors had worked at the drum shop at one time or another, some from the age of 15.

Like any good genealogist, Dick and Thom became interested in the local history that went along with the family and corporate history they had already discovered.  They realized for Granville history they should ask at the Granville Public Library.  And there they came across a treasure trove of photos – of Granville people, places and things cared for by Rose Miller, long-time curator of the library’s Historical Room.

Dick recommended GPL contact Digital Commonwealth to digitize the collection.  He was able to vouch for the helpful and patient staff.  Dick had nothing but compliments for Nichole, Jake and Eben.  All of whom he said went over and above the standard service.  Still, GPL was hesitant to ship its original documents.  The DC staff drove out to pick  up and return the collection it, so GPL could relax.

Johnson's Bridge
Johnson’s Bridge Granville Public Library

GPL was even more reluctant to part with its photos.  Dick offered and came through with a system whereby he digitized the photos using his personal camera, a home-made stand and extra lighting for the best TIF format images possible.  Then he sent a USB drive to Digital Commonwealth.  Although they were working with photos of photos, Dick thinks the images DC harvested were pretty close to the “gold standard” for digital images.

Not being trained archivists, Dick and Thom didn’t know much about metadata.  However, they got a crash course from DC staff as well as attending  New England Document Conservation Center (NEDCC)  training events.  They were then able to send spreadsheets with basic metadata and DC “did the rest.”  In the end, the collaboration was a great success on all fronts.

Dick believes that restoring the story of Granville has two parts.  Part I, as we have discussed here, was the organization and preservation of the historical source materials. Part II is documenting the stories of these materials, but that’s a story for another post.

Taunton Post Office
Taunton Post Office from Taunton Public Library A.L. Ward Photographs

 

Earlier this month, the Taunton Daily Gazette began a new, occasional series called Taunton: Then and Now.  The Gazette is providing all the Now photos, but the Then photos come courtesy of Digital Commonwealth.  I leave it up to you to decide if the no difference public library photos are more remarkable than the totally different post office buildings.

If you’ve been taking photos of your home town, try to find some Then photos of your town on Digital Commonwealth to match your Now photos.  Don’t let Taunton have all the fun.

Greetings from Lebanon, Pennsylvania.
Greetings from Lebanon, Penna. from BPL Tichnor Brothers Collection

LebTown, an independent media organization in Lebanon, Pennsylvania, has discovered Digital Commonwealth – big time!  In a posting entitled, Wish You Were Here: Lebanon County postcards of decades past, LebTown uses over 20 postcards from the Boston Public Library’s Tichnor Brothers Collection.  This collection includes approximately 25,000 office proof postcards from across the United States.  LebTown, naturally, has extracted many postcards of interest to residents of Lebanon County.  They advise any viewers to go to “Massachusetts Digital Commonwealth” for postcards for the rest of Pennsylvania and “other states”.

If you need a little inspiration for planning your vacation this summer, Tichnor Brothers concentrated on views of vacation spots.  Take a look at California, the Grand Canyon, or Vacationland itself, Maine.

 

 

Leslie Jones with camera in tarp at Fenway
Leslie Jones with Graflex in tarp at Fenway Leslie Jones Collection, BPL

The Patriot Ledger (Quincy, MA) headlined its A GOOD AGE column on January 21, 2019, “Discovering a 20th Century Boston ‘camera man’“.  The ‘camera man’ is Leslie Ronald Jones of Digital Commonwealth’s extremely popular Leslie Jones Collection from the Boston Public Library.  The Patriot Ledger highlights photos of interest to their readership, like shipbuilding in Quincy.  But even they could not resist one of Jones’ more humorous Fenway Park photos – Jones himself with camera emerging from a tarp rolled up on the field.  There really wasn’t anyplace he wouldn’t go for a good photo!

Instructors Nichole Shea and Julia Howington at the Omeka workshop at the BPL
Instructors Nichole Shea and Julia Howington at the Omeka workshop at the BPL

The Digital Commonwealth Outreach and Education Committee is responsible for all the workshops and classes that Digital Commonwealth offers to the cultural institutions of Massachusetts.  While DC has offered workshops on metadata, the digitization process and understanding copyright, the popularity of the digital exhibit workshops took us by surprise.

We started with a workshop on Digital storytelling introducing attendees to various options.  As a follow up, we offered a hands-on workshop specifically on Omeka.  The Building a Digital Exhibit workshop had to be limited in size to allow for the hands-on instruction and they filled up fast.  Ken Liss, Brookline Historical Society president, attended the Omeka workshop in Worcester in October.  He was so pleased with what he learned that he wrote the committee that he wanted to, “…share what I’ve done with Omeka.net thanks to what I learned at the workshop. I moved content from an old website into Omeka, where it will be much easier to maintain. (I actually created my Omeka account in 2014 with this project in mind, but was not able to make it work until I learned so much more at the workshop.)”

Learning Omeka at the Boston Public Library
Learning Omeka at the Boston Public Library

Another attendee suggested we follow up yet again with a showcase of the exhibits that attendees have organized since taking the workshop.  This might be an option – if the conference committee doesn’t steal it for a session at the annual conference – but in the meantime, you can take a look at Ken’s exhibit on Blake Park, a Brookline neighborhood and the people who lived in it from its development after World War I until the end of World War II.  It is still a work in progress and the photos are from BHS’ collection (i.e. not on Digital Commonwealth – yet), but it will give you an idea of what’s possible.

Our last Omeka workshop in December is fully booked.  Let us take a breath and regroup,  and then we hope to offer more of your favorite workshops in the New Year.

Written by Patricia Feeley, Interlibrary Loan Librarian, Boston Public Library

Photo case for Portrait of a man
Photo cover

Historic Newton’s Early Photograph Collection has something for everyone who loves photographs: daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, and tintypes, hand painted miniature portraits and cartes de visite.  You can see the fashionable cases of the day as well.  Many of Newton’s historically prominent families are included.  The poses struck range from the straightforward, all business portrait of Charles Redding, an African-American sailor who served on the famous USS Kearsage during the Civil War, to the dandified Stephen Winchester Dana Jackson in his fur-trimmed coat – and with a name that reads like the genealogical profile of a Boston Brahmin.

Sara Leavitt Goldberg, Archivist and Curator of Manuscripts and Photographs for Historic Newton (HN), took up her position about seven and a half years ago.  Always interested in photographs, she did a concentration in archives at Simmons College.  She then interned and consulted at Mount Auburn Cemetery in Watertown.  Sara’s predecessor at HN, Susan Abele, began the photo project 10 years ago.  With assistance from Ron Polito, co-author of Massachusetts photographers, 1839-1900, she created a comprehensive inventory of the photograph collection that Sara has found invaluable.

Charles Redding
Charles Redding

Inventory and collection in hand, Sara wanted to make it more broadly accessible while protecting her materials.  HN is a small, public/private collaborative and did not have the budget to digitize on its own.  Sara

went looking for a few good partners.

Digital Commonwealth (DC) had been on Sara’s radar since Simmons.  Sara knew she wanted to talk to DC.  She also knew about Simmons College’s internship program.  Here were two sources of free, professional help for her project.  Sara recommends both to small cultural institutions with limited budgets and big digitization dreams.

The photo inventory done by previous staff was an essential part of the process.  Kelsey Sawyer, the Simmons intern, handled all of the HN metadata based on the data in the inventory.  Sara is convinced the more prepared your institution is before you send your collection to digitization, the easier – and faster – it will go.  She characterizes her experience as “remarkably flawless.”

 Stephen Winchester Dana Jackson
Stephen Winchester Dana Jackson

Sara contacted DC in January, DC visited in February, she dropped off the collection in April, the imaging was done in June and uploaded in August.  She got her collection back in September.  It “truly could not have been easier.”

Sara sent HN staff a link to the collection and everyone was impressed.  She is eager to show the images off to her trustees and museum council.

Her advice to anyone still on the fence about digitization: Take the time to get your descriptions done and done right.  She gives full credit to HN staff for their work on the inventory and metadata.  Next, find yourself a few good partners.  She can recommend two.

In summary, Sara says it was “well worth the price of membership” to have DC digitize her collection.  HN owns some collections in partnership with the city, so Sara has some negotiating to do before she can send more collections.  But send more she will.

Written by Patricia Feeley, Interlibrary Loan Librarian, Boston Public Library

from NARA- Boston's Civil Defense Photos Collection
Improvising utensils from the Civil Defense Photo Collection

The National Archives at Boston (NARA-Boston) recently added a fascinating collection of Civil Defense photographs.  The Federal Civil Defense Administration (FCDA) had the two-fold job of preparing Americans for natural disasters and military attacks.  Its heyday was in the Cold War years of the 1950’s.  It may be best known these days for its (in)famous Duck and Cover animated film.  However, the agency also assisted with natural disaster preparation.  One of the nationwide exercises it ran was emergency mass feeding courses, which were useful for either agency responsibility.  In an emergency, one might not have access to a full kitchen, so citizens were taught how to improvise utensils and how to cook without access to a kitchen.

Another exercise was Operation Alert.  Instituted in 1954, these exercises were designed to test how well the nation responded to a virtual nuclear attack.  The day after an exercise, newspapers published reports of

Operation "Alert" 1956 -Harvard, Massachusetts from Civil Defense Photo Collection
Operation “Alert” 1956 -Harvard, Massachusetts from Civil Defense Photo Collection

these virtual attacks.  They would even detail the number of virtual cities hit, the number of virtual bombs that were dropped, and the number of virtual casualties.  Pacifists in New York protested what they saw as the absurdity of preparing to survive a nuclear attack.  Soon a group of young mothers joined the protest.  The protests grew to include students and spread nationwide.  Operation Alert was permanently cancelled in 1962.

You may notice browsing the collection, as I did, that women are prominently featured in the Civil Defense photographs. This is not by accident.   The FCDA created a massive recruitment campaign targeting women.  While women were mainly directed toward care-giving roles, you can see in the poster for Women’s Activities and Conferences that women also were expected to train to take up arms in defense of the country.

Women's Activities and Conferences [1958-1960] from Civil Defense Photo Collection
Women’s Activities [1958-1960] from Civil Defense Photo Collection
Alfie Paul, Director of Archival Operations at NARA-Boston, has been with the National Archives for 10 years and in his current position as director of the Boston field unit since February of 2015.

One of NARA’s main strategic goals nationally is digitization.  So when Alfie assumed his position in Boston, he wanted to make digitization a priority in Boston, too.  Like many of Digital Commonwealth’s members, he was hampered by a lack of resources to do it on his own.  He recognized that using the services of Digital Commonwealth was a great solution for his organization – and for the people of Massachusetts, who he suspected were not aware of all that NARA-Boston offers.  Or even that NARA has a presence in the state.  However, no other NARA unit had worked out a similar partnership.

Alfie wanted to get all his facts straight before taking his proposal to headquarters.  Digital Commonwealth welcomed Alfie and one of his archivists to visit the facilities and answered all his questions so he could speak knowledgeably to his superiors.  In fact, Alfie did so much research and investigation that after his project was approved, nothing that occurred during the process of the project surprised him.  The “only real challenge” was making sure the metadata was compliant with the way NARA catalogs its records.  I know metadata compliance is a challenge shared by many of DC’s members – here’s proof it can be overcome.

In all, Alfie estimates it took two months from start to finish to digitize his materials.  He is eager to add more.  Boston historians will be thrilled if his “dream” of digitizing the Morgan v. Hennigan case file (Boston busing) – all 50 cubic feet of it – comes true.  Alfie will keep sending records as long as DC “keep[s] doing what they do.  It’s a fantastic resource.”

Two sailors from the USS Masonfrom U.S. Naval District 1 Photo Collection
Two sailors from the USS Mason from U.S. Naval District 1 Photo Collection

NARA-Boston has two collections on DC currently.  Alfie is partial to the Photographs of the First Naval District collection.  One of his favorites is of two sailors from the USS Mason, the first predominately African-American ship in the U.S. Navy.  He’s already featured it on the NARA-Boston website.

Next up will be photos of the Watertown Arsenal.  Stayed tuned.

The “best feedback” Alfie could get on his digitization projects is also the best feedback for DC: The Archivist of the United States “loves it”.

Written by Patricia Feeley, Collaborative Services Librarian, Boston Public Library

"Massachusetts Normal Art School, Deacon House," from the Campus Life collection.
“Massachusetts Normal Art School, Deacon House,” from the Campus Life collection.

Massachusetts Normal Art School opened in 1873 with the goal of educating art teachers to teach drawing at lower levels of education.  The hope was that this effort would result in more architects for the growing country.  Massachusetts Normal Art School became Massachusetts School of Art became Massachusetts College of Art and, finally Massachusetts College of Art and Design (MassArt).

MassArt prides itself on having always been a progressive school.  As a teacher’s college, it began with a majority female student body.  MassArt also accepted African-American students early on.  It was, and today is the only, publicly-funded art-only school in the country.  Over the years, the mission has changed, but the creativity of the students continues.

Danielle Sangalang has only been at MassArt for a little over a year.  After graduating with a dual degree of MA in history and MLS in library and information science with a concentration in archives studies from Simmons College, she obtained a history degree and worked for the Department of Conservation and Recreation, the National Park Services and the Trustees of Reservations.

When she arrived at MassArt, the college had already digitized a physical exhibit of historical photos on campus life.  She has since used Digital Commonwealth (DC) to digitized school yearbooks and just last month dropped off a collection of student handbooks.

Palette and Pen from MassArt yearbook collection.
Palette and Pen from MassArt yearbook collection.

Danielle had a great experience working with Digital Commonwealth.  She appreciated the onsite visit which allowed her to float her ideas and listen to suggestions from DC staff.  Together they decided to use the option of having her bound materials scanned by Internet Archive.  Danielle was aware of DC from as long ago as her days at Simmons College.  As a professional, she thinks DC is a great resource for “lone arrangers” like her, especially because it is free.  She knew as soon as she started at MassArt that she wanted to begin to work with DC to digitize some of her collection’s treasures.

Danielle’s yearbook project began with an email July 19, 2016.  A site visit was scheduled for September 7 and the first yearbooks were dropped off September 14.  The entire project was done by December 12.  As quickly as this went, Danielle wished she’d known ahead that she would be without the yearbooks for months.  Some of the yearbooks were unique copies and she was continued to receive requests for scans while they were inaccessible.

It was worth it, though.  Once the yearbooks became available, Danielle sent an all-campus email announcing the completed digitization.  Staff and faculty responded quickly with their thanks and delight at being able to view the yearbooks online.

"Student handbook" from MassArt handbook collection.
“Student handbook” from MassArt handbook collection.

Danielle’s second project was MassArt’s Student Association handbooks, a collection spanning 80 years beginning in the 1920’s.  This collection is Danielle’s pick for highlighting.  The early years are both handbook –rules and regulations, the “MSA creed”, student activities – and directory – student names, addresses and telephone numbers.  For anyone interested in the history of MassArt, they are a goldmine.

The 1937-1938 handbook, for example, offered students information on the glee club and yearbook committee, but also the magic and fencing clubs.  Danielle pointed out that the magic club existed for 10 years.  Who knew?

Danielle plans to continue to use DC as MassArt gears up to celebrate its 150th anniversary in 2023.  If DC didn’t prioritize collections from institutions who have not previously had a project done in the current fiscal year, Danielle would be submitting requests as fast as DC could do them.

Speaking of MassArt’s history, that once physical exhibit now digital collection on Campus Life is available on the DC website.  The photos span late 19th century class trips to Lake Asquam in New Hampshire to a studio of students playing checkers in 1918 to mid-20th century fashions from the design classes.

Portrait of class of 1927 on Smock Day from MassArt Campus Life collection.
Portrait of class of 1927 on Smock Day from MassArt Campus Life collection.

A charming bit of MassArt’s history is Smock Day. Danielle only recently learned that Smock Day was the final acceptance of the freshman into the ranks of the student body.  The seniors gave smocks to the freshmen to welcome them.  It was a big deal: There were Smock Day class photos, Smock Day dances (Admission was free with Student Association membership.) and the school president gave a dinner in honor of Smock Day.  Quite the welcome!

Photos of students’ work are not abundant.  Danielle would love to have the final drawings students do to complete their degrees digitized.  The drawings are loose and come in a variety of sizes, so they are not prime candidates for digitization.  But come the day DC can handle them, Danielle will be there with her completed application.

 

 

 

 

The Trustees of Reservations : a bulletin of news, comment and opinion in the field of conservation
The Trustees of Reservations : a bulletin of news, comment and opinion in the field of conservation

This post was written by Patricia Feeley, BPL Collaborative Services Librarian.

For a 126-year-old organization, the Trustees of Reservations is not that well-known for its cultural heritage collections.  People are often familiar with the properties they own – the Crane Estate in Ipswich, Naumkeag in Stockbridge, World’s End in Hingham or Dinosaur Footprints in Holyoke – but not the history they curate.  It is easy to imagine that an organization with so much history and so wide a scope would have amassed an impressive collection.

Alison Bassett and Sarah Hayes were members of the Trustees before they began working at the Trustees’ Archives and Research Center (ARC).  Alison had a background in documentary film that included researching in archives just like the one she now heads.  Sarah’s background included a library science degree, cultural heritage programs and experience as a member of Digital Commonwealth’s Metadata Mob.  In fact, Sarah worked on metadata for one of the Trustees’ collections as a Mobster before she was hired by The Trustees.

ARC staff knew what a terrific collection they had in their Archives and Research Center.  However, it was hard for staff across the state to access easily and virtually unknown to the public.  The decision was made to digitize records to preserve and promote them.  The preservation work began before Digital Commonwealth (DC) was involved.  But both Alison and Sarah agreed that DC would provide the next step in the process.

The Trustees wanted to have its digital collections available on a statewide site that mirrored its own statewide reach.  Alison and Sarah stressed the value in having complementary Massachusetts historical collections to search on one site for images that enrich your own research when that just right image isn’t in your own holdings.

Neither is shy about why they love Digital Commonwealth:

  1. It’s free.
  2. The Digital Commonwealth staff is easy to work with and they do excellent work.

It doesn’t get much better than that.  With a small staff, Alison was happy to take advantage of the larger DC staff, who could devote more time to digitization projects.  For the recently added Appleton Farms collection, there were many photo albums that needed to be broken down before scanning.  DC was able to do this and do it quicker than ARC staff.  Alison and Sarah appreciated consulting with DC staff about which albums were most representative and which would be easiest to work with.  It took about a year from first contact to seeing the Appleton Farms collection uploaded, but this was mainly due to workload issues at the Trustees.

The Trustees currently have three collections on Digital Commonwealth: Trustees of Reservations Institutional Publications, Photographs from Stevens-Coolidge Place and the Appleton Family Photo Album Collection.

The first collection is straightforward.  Already, Alison has referred a staffer in western Massachusetts to the digitized Annual Reports.  The staffer was thrilled to be able to do his own research and Alison was thrilled not to have to scan and send dozens of pages.

The most recent collection added, the Appleton Family Photo Album Collection, depicts the oldest continuously operating farm in America and the family that founded it in 1636. The property was turned over to the Trustees in 1998.  The farm’s last heirs and residents were Francis Randall Appleton, Jr. (1885-1974) and his wife, Joan Egleston Appleton (1912-2006).  Joan lived on the farm until her death.

Francis Appleton was a “gentleman farmer”.  His home was still a working farm, but limited in its operations.  Like many gentlemen farmers of the time, Appleton sent Christmas cards showing livestock (turkeys, cows, horses) and farm scenes.  The farm also ran the Barberry Kennels for a time.  One Christmas card shows that year’s litter of terriers, each one’s name beginning with the letter V.  One of this line would go on to win Best of Class at the Westminster Kennel Club Show.

Barberry Kennels, Appleton Farms, Ipswich, Mass. Merry Christmas, 1945, from J.R., Jr. & Joan E. Appleton
Barberry Kennels, Appleton Farms, Ipswich, Mass. Merry Christmas, 1945, from J.R., Jr. & Joan E. Appleton

The largest of the three collections is the Photographs from Stevens-Coolidge Place.  When the ARC staff first consulted with DC, they planned to start with a smaller collection.  DC staff urged them to think bigger and this collection of over 1800 images was the result.

ARC chose this collection in part because it contained a wide variety of photographic formats (daguerreotypes, tintypes, cabinet cards, cartes de visite, albumen prints, cyanotypes, collodion prints, silver gelatin prints, 35mm color prints, and Polaroids.)  It also contained great photos. The families were world travelers, so the scope of the collection is broad.  Also, Stevens-Coolidge Place house is usually closed to the public, so interior photographs offer access not often available.

Studio portrait of unidentified woman in black dress and monocle with cigarette posing with Great Dane; whip and glove on floor
Studio portrait of unidentified woman in black dress and monocle with cigarette posing with Great Dane; whip and glove on floor

This is also the collection that included Alison’s and Sarah’s favorite items to highlight.  Alison chose a wonderfully eccentric studio portrait of an unidentified woman dressed all in black.  Unlike the many other photos of women staring dreamily off into the distance, this woman looks straight back at the viewer through her monocle.  Yes, monocle.  She has an ungloved hand holding a Great Dane in place by her side and a gloved hand holding a cigarette.  At her feet lays her other glove and what the description identifies as a “whip”, but is perhaps more of a riding crop.  Either way, it is an unusual photo.

Alison admits the photo is intriguing on its own, but the ARC has no information on who the sitter is or why she chose to be depicted this way.  What delights Alison is that the one clue – the photographer’s name – leads to a different historical topic.  The photographer was a woman.

Emily Stokes appears in Frances Willard’s 1897 book, Occupations for Women: A Book of Practical Suggestions for the Material Advancement, the Mental and Physical Development, and the Moral and Spiritual Uplift of Women.  Here we discover that Mrs. Stokes is a British immigrant to America who had been a professional photographer in Boston for 16 years at the time of publication.  Child portraits are identified as her specialty.  Photography is promoted as an occupation for women because it no longer involves “dangerous chemicals” or as heavy equipment as in earlier years.  Ms. Willard emphasizes that electricity has made photography a good outlet for a woman’s “light touch.”

Portrait of Empress Dowager Cixi seated on throne
Portrait of Empress Dowager Cixi seated on throne

Sarah also highlights a photograph that originally seemed unremarkable, but led to a greater historical understanding of the Trustees collection.  It is a portrait of the Empress Dowager Cixi.  A separate project cataloguing objects in the collection led to a find of some textiles that were identified as Chinese.  Additional research connected these textiles to the Empress, who was known for promoting textiles created by Chinese women.   Sarah appreciates that this richer history is made possible by having these images available where connections can be made by researchers.

Alison and Sarah urge other cultural heritage organizations to take the plunge and add more collections to Digital Commonwealth.